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Why is saliva important to your oral cavity? It does something called saliva remineralization, where your tooth surfaces are protected from the demineralization of teeth. This enamel remineralization is important to your oral health, as it prevents tooth decay and dental erosion.

What is Saliva Remineralization?

Why is saliva important to your oral cavity? It does something called saliva remineralization, where your tooth surfaces are protected from the demineralization of teeth. This enamel remineralization is important to your oral health, as it prevents tooth decay and dental erosion.

Saliva is one of the things we tend to take for granted. We only notice it when visible. But it’s essential when taking care of your oral cavity and overall oral health. But how does it do this? Through saliva remineralization.

We all know that saliva has the enzymes that make it easier to digest the things you eat. Aside from breaking down food, however, it also does a ton of functions in the oral cavity. The American Dental Association lists some of them as follows:

  • Clears leftover food particles and fermentable carbohydrates;
  • Transports disease-fighting cells through the mouth to stop any instances of decay or infection;
  • Blends in essential minerals—such as phosphate, calcium, and fluoride—into the tooth surfaces to keep them healthy.

 Each function plays a vital role in preventing the demineralization of teeth and maintaining your oral health. By washing away food particles and fermentable carbohydrates, your saliva lessens the amount of fuel harmful oral bacteria convert into acid. The disease-fighting substances further bring down their numbers, ensuring they don’t deal too much damage.

Today, however, we’ll be focusing on the third point—saliva remineralization. But how does this enamel remineralization happen? And why is it so important?

Saliva comes from your blood

Before we look into why saliva is important, we should first ask where saliva comes from. And as it turns out, your saliva comes from your blood. As a matter of fact, according to Enders and Enders, saliva is actually filtered blood. 

 When saliva is produced, your blood goes through the salivary glands, which keep away the red blood cells and retain the rest. “The rest,” of course, includes hormones, immune system products, and the necessary minerals.

Why enamel remineralization is important

Because the demineralization of teeth happens daily, the tendency is you need to continually infuse your tooth surfaces with minerals so it can defend itself against bacterial attacks. And it does just this every time you eat.

You trigger your saliva flow when you eat or chew. Once this happens, the salivary glands sieve the blood and produce all the good stuff your oral cavity needs to protect itself. 

You can’t eliminate harmful oral bacteria 100%, so, for the most part, you’ll have to deal with those small instances of dental erosion continually. And because plaque builds up between the times you don’t brush your teeth, you need a mechanism to make sure your tooth surfaces aren’t overrun with tooth decay by the time you do brush and floss. 

This is where the importance of saliva comes through. In a sense, it plays both offense and defense when it comes to protecting the oral cavity. But while saliva does do much of the heavy lifting, it can’t function on its own. You’ll still need to keep to good oral health practices—such as brushing regularly and eating tooth-healthy foods—so plaque doesn’t overtake saliva’s protective properties. 

It’s a little tricky, then, if you have a dry mouth. Because there are fewer chances of saliva remineralization, you’re more likely to get tooth decay. In this case, you might need to cut down on the fermentable carbohydrates and take extra care with your oral health. In this case, it’s best to head to the dental office and consult your dentist.

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